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Saturday, September 20, 2014

James M. "Kain Tuck" Rush

James M. "Kain Tuck" Rush (1826-1892). Carpenter. Farmer. Pioneer. James M. was born in 1826  to Henson and Margaret Stout Rush, the first son of six children.
James married 2 times, first to Mary Blake circa 1848. They were the first Rush family to migrate to Missouri from the present-day Adair County, Kentucky. The following year, after Mary died in childbirth in Booneville, he headed west to California's gold fields.

Wedding Photo: James and Theresa Rush
Enroute with his wagon train, he stumbled across a nearly dead man who had been fenced in because he had fallen ill. Rather than risking the spread of a possible deadly disease, wagon trains often left the sick in wooden pens to ward off wild animals, with enough food and water to last them for a few days. As the wagon train meant to camp close by a few days, James nursed the man, named John Walls, until he regained his strength and was able, with James' help, to keep up with the travelers when they moved on. Mr. Walls dubbed James "Kain Tuck," because James was a "Kaintuckian" (from Kentucky); he felt indebted to the man who rescued him.
James had little success in finding gold, so he returned to Missouri, sailing around South America. He married his 2nd wife, Theresa Jane Loveall (1835-1909), February 1, 1855 in Miller County. Seven children were born to this union.
James was listed as a southern sympathizer in August of 1862 after the Civil War began, automatically revoking his citizenship. However, since he served in the Union Army as a private in Co. B, 6th Regiment MO. Cavalry from June 11, 1863 to July 18, 1865, was honorably discharged with no injuries, his citizenship rights were restored in May, 1866.
Both were laid to rest in the Rush Chapel Cemetery, Miller County, MO.

More to Read:
1. The Rush Report. Compiled by Gaynelle Jenkins Moore. Research Assistance: David W. Rush. March 2003.
2. The Loveall Report. Compiled by Gaynelle Jenkins Moore. April 2010.
3. See the Leaf labeled biographies for more information.

Places to Visit:
1.  Miller County Museum, 2005 Highway 52, Tuscumbia, MO.
2. Rush Chapel Cemetery, (see his Civil War Veteran tombstone), on Rush Road between Mary's Home and Tuscumbia, Miller County.
3. Findagrave # 40277126

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